Five percent to impact


Good product. Good people. Good place.

We are committed to creating quality organic wines, that are progressive, approachable and celebrate their own personalities.

We commit ourselves, beyond wine, to always contribute at least 5% of revenue to positive social and environmental impact.


In 2020 we:

  • ⋐ Contributed 5.2% of our revenue to impact.

  • ⋒ Composted over 27 tonnes of organic 'waste' back into soil.

  • ⋑ Planted 2,049 trees.

  • ⋓ Went beyond carbon neutral.

+ And more...  


Introducing, our 2020 Impact Report.


Read it now:

Desktop version | Mobile version


THANKS TO YOU WE'VE PLANTED 3656 TREES THIS YEAR!

We feel so grateful to be able to plant one tree for every dozen sold. Here is a little info on where your trees went in 2021.




Fruit Trees in India

Where
Haryana, Rajasthan & Uttar Pradesh provinces.

When
January – October 2021 (part of an ongoing project).

Trees
Mango, avocado, papaya, guava, jackfruit, plum, lemon, orange, gooseberry, moringa, custard apple, wood apple.

Your contribution
1218 trees!

Project size
1.5 million fruit trees planted in the past 5 years + 1.5 million planned for 2021

About the project
Part of an ongoing community-led project in Northwest India, this initiative works with local farmers and community groups to plant a variety of different fruit trees. These trees provide long-term nourishment, income, resiliency and food sovereignty for marginalised farmers and communities. It is estimated that each tree generates on average $13 (AUD) per year in additional income after three years of planting. These trees also provide a suite of ecological benefits including soil improvements and water conservation. This year they are building two new nurseries in central locations to boost seedling production, reduce transportation emissions and costs and increase seedling acclimatisation so the trees have a higher survival rate and are more likely to bear fruit. These nurseries will employ local people, with a specific focus on widowed and elderly women.


Australian Bushfire Recovery

Where
SA, VIC, NSW, QLD.

When
January – December 2022 (part of an ongoing project).

Trees
Sheoak, red gum, red spotted gum, apple box, manna gum + other site-specific species.

Your contribution
1217 trees!

Project size
1 million trees in total, 400,000 planned in 2022.

About the project
This project has been created to support the development of bushfire recovery projects, specifically for revegetation on public and private land, since the devastating 2019/2020 bushfires. Located inside the official FNPW (Foundation for National Park and Wildlife) bushfire recovery priority areas, this project aims to restore habit, fund and build local nurseries, create new local volunteer programs and support long-term recovery initiatives. The trees planted will be site-specific, with a focus also on planting specific trees that provide critical habitat for local fauna that have been displaced, like the threatened black cockatoo and koala. There will be a mixture of forest and understory planting to create biodiverse ecosystems.


Kenyan Agroforestry

Where
Kitui County.

When
October 2021 – April 2022.

Trees
Mango, avocado, blackthorn, silky oak, melia, neem, tamarind, river tamarind, calliandra, macadamia.

Your contribution
1217 trees!

Project size
50,000 trees.

About the project
This project embraces agroforestry techniques as a means to achieve ecological restoration and community resiliency. Agroforestry, as the name hints, is an integrated farming approach that incorporates shrubs and trees (for fruit and/or timber) in and around crops and/or pastureland. For this project, community groups will be mobilised and trained so that they can propagate a diverse mix of trees and shrubs. Three nurseries will be established to facilitate the training and propagation, and the trees will be planted on farms as well as local schools and some public land. Ecologically speaking, this project aims to improve soil fertility, increase biodiversity, improve crop and pasture protection (via shade and windbreaks), improve water conservation and help with climate change adaptation. It will also improve economic resiliency, health and nutrition, sustainability outcomes, gender equality, food sovereignty and security as well as helping to maintain the propagation of culturally significant trees and shrubs.